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Bourbon Reviews Jim Beam

Jim Beam Black Double Aged

Verdict: Warming, flavorful

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It’s hard to drink Jim Beam Black without comparing it to Jim Beam original which is probably what most of us cut our teeth on. Black is aged 8 years whereas white is aged 4 years (thus the “double aged” moniker on the label). Black carries a higher price, but carries more complex flavors and I found it much more drinkable than white.

The bottle reveals a rich, dark amber color with a nice body. The barrels are charred new white oak, but I’m not getting the smokey smell that I was expecting. I do get some a nice vanilla aroma even well after the glass is empty.

After a few pleasant sips neat, I added a few ice cubes which helped it opening up, although it held up fairly well without. I found mild flavors of caramel and orange on the tongue. Probably the most dominant characteristic is that starts strong and stays strong (at only 86 proof). So if you’re into a good long burn, you will think this is great.

Just like the original, I think Jim Beam Black is an excellent value for the money. The bottom line is that black is more palatable without a mixer than white, so its advantage is versatility.

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Bourbon Reviews Woodford

Woodford Reserve Review

Verdict: Will not disappoint

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Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select has always been one of my favorites. This is straight-up good bourbon and worth every penny. I know the price is not completely outrageous, but a lot of folks opt for a more economical bourbon like Jack or Jim as an every day drink. I suggest to go ahead and splurge on this one every now and again. It doesn’t stray off the path too much, but it’s a good bit smoother so I don’t think you will be disappointed.

The smell of Woodford is fairly sweet with a good oaky bouquet and a bit of barrel char. It’s not overly sweet, but maybe comes in a little syrupy for some. It has a good balance of honey and brown sugar flavors. I don’t get a big burn, but it does have a nice soft, long finish.

It may be noted that the age is not listed on the bottle and every bottle is numbered with a batch/bottle number. Based on US law any bourbon that is aged less than four years has to have an age statement, so any Woodford bottle that you may get is at least four years old.

For me Woodford has a very drinkable quality. It’s fairly easy to find and I often choose it as my default. It may be a bit pricey as a highball, but a great treat over ice or neat. Enjoy!